Kubernetes Operators (or as I refer to them friendly k8s robots) — in my opinion — revolutionized Kubernetes. If you have heard me tell the story of the three k8s distributions being k8s, Techtonic and OpenShift — you will know that Operators took OpenShift 3 into overdrive by being able to support OTA, single-click, no-downtime upgrades and installs of the entire cluster.

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Seven-of-Nine, the Borg who inspired the original codename of Kubernetes, and to whom homage is paid in the Kubernetes logo.

All bias aside — Red Hat OpenShift 4 is absolutely stunning (frankly $34B stunning). Operators don't stop at cluster management, these robot admins can package and manage any application that runs on Kubernetes meaning that installing and managing stateful, complex applications like databases are now a doddle on OpenShift and k8s. …


Following on from my previous story about how to find happiness in a busy life, I spent the weekend thinking about this question. I found an answer for me — is not about finding it, but rather noticing it.

It occurred to me that my busyness wasn’t making me unhappy or not happy — it was not allowing me to take time to enjoy when I was experiencing happiness.

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Photo by Tiffany Chan on Unsplash

Friday evening, after I posted Part 1, I decided to stop and take notice of what I was doing. …


“Happiness is when what you think, what you say, and what you do are in harmony.” The smaller the gap between what you should do, and what you actually do — the happier you will be.” … Mahatma Gandhi

Caveat: This blog is not supposed to be a pity party.

Confession: I spent an awful amount of time not happy.

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I am sitting at my desk it is 18:55 on a Friday and I am looking at the mountain of things to do that have piled up all week and all day. This mountain I am looking at is just my day job mountain, there is another mountain for things I have to do at home, another mountain for things I have to do in my volunteering and there is another mountain things I am neglecting — family, friends, me — that actually doesn’t even make a pile because I can’t bear to start counting that as well. …


This post is about understanding serverless in the context of CGI. It covers whether serverless is actually a new innovation, how serverless is different from CGI of the 90s, and what you should understand about serverless in the ’20s to take advantage of its potential.

When you finish this post you will understand the serverless of today in 2020 and why you will want to use it. This post will be most interesting to IT decision-makers, architects, developers, and other old CGI-programmers like myself.

Haven’t we seen serverless before?

In my work with OpenShift and Kubernetes I am always looking at the new innovation and one of the new innovations is serverless. Now, at first I didn’t get it all. I didn’t get it because I could not understand what all the fuss was about. People were going on about this amazing new technology that enabled code to be executed on demand. Huh? …


The Bluejeans I am referring to is the video conferencing system bluejeans.com — not the iconic clothing invented by Levi Strauss and Jacob Davis in 1873. The quirk itself is not important, only to say that it had been annoying me for a very very long time. It involved screen sharing in which bluejeans kept showing the wrong screen from the one I picked. This would result in a bit of fluster in my otherwise smooth presentation as I tried to work out how to jumble around to get the correct screen to show. I devised a workaround — select the screen it thinks is my main presentation screen. Good enough for now, but the problem still plagued my mind. …

About

Mandi Buswell

Thing I like: ideas, logic, understanding, data, connections, fairness, technology, horses, random quirky stuff, lifehacks, language, travelling, people, family

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